Type poster

Hello!
I know I was supposed to post this a several days ago, but my illustrator file has been giving me a really hard time. The file I’m working on is extremely huge and it takes foreverrrrr to make changes, that’s because I changed the space background to a higher quality image which made the file very big in size. It even crashed on me a few times (once after I was done with the whole this and I lost more than half of the work :”””( ).

Anyways, I was able to get a few screenshots of the final posters. I have 3 different variations of three different opacity levels for the filled circle. I prefer the one with the lowest opacity, what do you think?

 

Type poster draft 2

Hello everyone,

This weekend while I was working on my other projects, Jay-Z’s song “Forever Young” was playing in my head over and over again. So, I got this idea of putting the lyrics in my type poster because it’s kinda related to my typeface where it’s very young and casual. I also included Arabic translation of the song.

Type poster draft

Hello!!

So I started putting the ideas I had for the posters on illustrator, however what I did so far does not look like how I wanted it to look like because it still need more work. My idea for the first one is to make the poster look like a page from a notebook because the typeface is my handwriting, and add some quotes, song lyrics, and doodles. For the second one, I was just thinking of putting a quote (might be changed), and playing with the color, illustration, size, layout…etc. kind of like what you see on tumblr.com :p

Final typeface: Raw

Hello!!
I’m so happy I’m finally done with creating my full bilingual typeface. I’m really happy with the results and I think it really shows consistency throughout the typeface. I extremely enjoyed creating them, both while sketching and transforming them into digital vectors.I had few difficulties with some of the letters but I was able to think of a solution after few sketches. Also, I believe that creating the Arabic version of the typeface is somewhat harder and more time consuming than the English letters. So if you ever think of create a typeface don’t ever leave the Arabic letters to the last minute! :p

Narrative:

For our second Typography 2 project this semester, we are asked to create a full bilingual typeface, and associate is with one of the type classifications given to us. After lots of thinking about what the typeface I will create could look like, I finally decided to make it a handwritten typeface.

People always told my I have a very legible, clear, and neat handwriting. So, I always imagined it being a full functioning typeface for people to use. I finally got the opportunity to make it happen. Even though the typeface will look like my font, I will still make changes and adjust the thicknesses, sizes…etc. Handwritten typefaces usually look very scribbly and scratchy, however, I’m hoping mine will be more settled, clean, and not very scribbly. It will be quite curvy (but not too curvy), sans serif, and casual.

I imagine my typeface to be used in fun and more informal occasions. It will probably be used by the younger generations. One special aspect about handwritten typefaces is that they almost always look very friendly. So, I don’t think it will be used in a poster for a horror movie.

Even though we don’t usually pay attention to the characteristics of our handwritings, it is very important to think about them when transforming them into a font. All letters should have same proportions, thicknesses, and overall feeling.

Sketches:

(to be added)

Digital Vector Phase:

Final Bilingual Font Specimen Sheets:

Process of Creating my own Typeface

Hi!

So I’ve been working on my type for the past two weeks, and I’m actually starting to see how it will look like digitally. I think sketching has helped me BIG TIME while creating the typeface. I created a gridded sheet to help me with the sketches then scanned and transferred them to illustrator.

Here is what I’ve done so far, I still need to finish the rest of the Arabic letters and refine them+the English letters.

 

 

Bilingual Typographic Narrative

For our second Typography 2 project this semester, we are asked to create a full bilingual typeface, and associate is with one of the type classifications given to us. After lots of thinking about what the typeface I will create could look like, I finally decided to make it a handwritten typeface.

People always told my I have a very legible, clear, and neat handwriting. So, I always imagined it being a full functioning typeface for people to use. I finally got the opportunity to make it happen. Even though the typeface will look like my font, I will still make changes and adjust the thicknesses, sizes…etc. Handwritten typefaces usually look very scribbly and scratchy, however, I’m hoping mine will be more settled, clean, and not very scribbly. It will be quite curvy (but not too curvy), sans serif, and casual.

I imagine my typeface to be used in fun and more informal occasions. It will probably be used by the younger generations. One special aspect about handwritten typefaces is that they almost always look very friendly. So, I don’t think it will be used in a poster for a horror movie.

Even though we don’t usually pay attention to the characteristics of our handwriting, it is very important to think about them when transforming them into a font. All letters should have same proportions, thicknesses, and overall feeling.

So What is a Handwritten Typeface?

Handwritten typefaces are obviously typefaces that look like they’ve been handwritten. They could look like script, curvy, sribbly, scratchy…etc. Also, handwritten typefaces can sometime have a texture to it, to make it look like it has been written down by a crayon, a pencil, or ink.

Examples of Handwritten Typefaces:

Examples of Posters that use Handwritten Typefaces:

Initial Sketches:

Final Boots Arabic Logo

Hi again!
So I’ve been working on my Boots logo translation, and I’m finally done with it :D. I had to make few different variations to come up with the final design. Some of the things I had to consider before designing the logo included: the thicks and thins in the lines, color, composition, spelling/readability, and the over all feeling of the logo.

 

As you can see, my only stumbling block was trying to make the letter “س” match the rest of the letters and keeping it consistent. First I tried using a ready س from an Arabic typeface, however it did not match the rest at all. Then I sketched it on a paper and traced it…. still did not work. Finally, I used another ready Arabic typeface, but I played with the shape and made it more curvy. I added the top and bottom extended line to make the Arabic logo match the English logo as much as possible.

 

Here is the final logo:

I’m back!

Hello everyone!!
It’s been long since my last blog post, I guess I was too busy enjoying my summer vacation that ended a bit too soon :’). It’s okay though, I am ready for this new  year with full energy, and I will hopefully do my best since I’m graduating next Spring.

We’ve started our Typography 2 course with a small interesting exercise where we have to make an Arabic version of a chosen logo. The logo I chose belongs to Boots Pharmacy. I chose it because it was the first logo I saw when I started looking for a logo that did not exist in Arabic. I’m already imagining how the Arabic version might look like. Can’t wait to start working on it! 😀